The PWU-JASMS Rondalla

The rondalla is an ensemble of stringed instruments played with the plectrum or pick and generally known as plectrum instruments. It originated in Medieval Spain, especially in Catalonia, Aragon, Murcia, and Valencia. The tradition was later taken to Spanish America and elsewhere. The word rondalla is from the Spanish ronda, meaning “serenade. The rondalla was introduced into the Philippines when it was part of the Spanish East Indies. In the early Philippines, certain styles were adopted by the Filipinos, especially guitar and banduria used in the Pandanggo, the Jota, and the Polka. The use of the term comparza was common, however, during the American period in the Philippines, the term rondalla became more used. (Wikipedia)

Philippine Women’s University-Jose Abad Santos Memorial School (PWU-JASMS) has been teaching its high-school and grade school students the art of music in rondalla fashion. I had a chance to watch and listen to their rondalla music when I attended PWU’s 2017 graduation ceremonies held at the Philippine International Convention Center (PICC) last Saturday, July 8… and I was completely blown away!
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I was transported back in time and felt that I was one of the Principalia (elite ruling class in the Philippines during the Spanish colonialization) living a good life in the 1800s.

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I understand that PWU-JASMS Rondalla has won the NAMCYA (National Music Competitions for Young Artists) Rondalla Ensemble Competition held at the Cultural Center of the Philippines on November 26, 2015. (from PWU Webpage)

The PWU-JASMS Rondalla was also chosen to perform during the gala dinner of the 30th Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit hosted by President Duterte last April 29, 2017 attended by the leaders and delegates of the member countries of the ASEAN. (from Lifestyle Inquirer)

Unfortunately, I was unable to take a video of their performance… but fret not, PWU-JASMS has lots of VLOGS at Youtube and here’s one of them – – NAMCYA 2015 Semi-finals (Kayamanan ng Lahi).

The Philippines… Home of Excellent Service with A Smile

Corniche is a buffet restaurant located at Diamond Hotel, a 5-star hotel, along Roxas Boulevard in Manila, Philippines.  Its selection of diversified food is composed of Asian, Western, and Japanese cuisines, including a salad and dessert station.

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Aside from the delicious food it offers to hotel guests and walk-in customers, Corniche is one of those places that provides excellent service with a smile which makes your dining experience unforgettable… and that’s exactly the very reason why I am one of their frequent diners.

But hey, the Philippines is the home of excellent service with a smile… 🙂

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Isaw-isaw (Grilled Chicken Intestines)

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This popular street food in the Philippine is what we call the “Isaw-isaw” or plainly, a grilled chicken intestine for the un-oriented. You see, nothing is wasted in our country. We eat everything in a chicken… its head, its organs, its blood, and even its feet. And believe it or not, we call the chicken feet barbecue as “Adidas”.

But wait…!

Like the chicken, we also eat everything in a cow,  a goat, a carabao (water buffalo), and a pig. We eat their heads, their guts and organs, their blood, and also their feet. We even eat the bone marrows of cows and carabaos.

So if our country is one of those places to visit in your bucket list, don’t be surprised if you see some parts of a livestock which you don’t normally eat being sold on the streets and in our local restaurants. It’s just one of the food we eat and is part of our local cuisine!

Bon apetit!

Nuong bata pa ako…!

I sometimes miss these days…

… Nuong sumasabit ako sa dyip habang may sumisigaw ng “… Valiches, Novaliches”!

… Nuong umaangkas ako sa traysikel na kakalog-kalog dahil sa lubak na daan!

… Nuong sumusundot ako ng pisbol sa kalyeng mausok at maalikabok at isasawsaw sa sukang punong-puno ng naiwang pisbol na lumulutang pa!

… Nuong nagbabasketball sa kanto na ang pustahan ay isang litrong Coke at handang maki-ramble dahil lang sa isang litrong Coke!

… Nuong nakikipagsiksikan sa bus at pinagpapawisan ang kilikili sa init dahil walang aircon pa ang mga buses nuon!

… Nuong tumatakbo at naghahabol ng dyip sa may Blumentrit para makasakay!

… Nuong naglalakad sa gatuhod na baha sa may Dimasalang!

… At higit sa lahat, nuong nakikipag-inuman na isang baso lang ang gamit at sardinas na maanghang ang pulutan, solb na!

Yup, those were the days! Masaya at laging exciting ang araw! Gawin ko nga uli minsan yan to feel how exciting it was… :):):)

The Walking Grocery Store

​Believe it or not… This guy is practically a walking “sari-sari store” (… sort of a mini-grocery store on the go)! And he is doing the selling right along a major road artery in the Metro called EDSA!

No worries… with our traffic situation at about 5kph or less during rush hours, these ambulant vendors are “technically safe” while they sell their commodities in the six-lane EDSA.

Only in the Philippines!

Philippines: The Ortigas Flyover on a Cloudy Day

I am really lagging behind in checking out the amazing blogs of those that I am following. My busy schedule will soon be over and I will again have some sweet time reading the wonderful blogs of my friends in the virtual blogworld. Missing you all…!

And just to have the blogworld know that I’m still here… Here’s some few photos I took going to the office today. 🙂

The Ortigas flyover on a cloudy Tuesday morning… Free of traffic because everyone is stuck in several kilometers of traffic from West Avenue to Santolan EDSA. And the hellish traffic again appears near Shaw EDSA.

That’s life on EDSA!

The Tagalog Word “Diyos” (god)… Where did it come from?

One of those things that is good to know…

Ika nga ni Ompong

​Ever wondered where the Tagalog word “diyos” (god in English) came from?

The word “diyos” had its roots in the Latin word “deus” (pronounced as de-yus) which means a god or a deity. The Latin word “deus” can also be translated as “dies” (Latin; pronounced as di-yes) or Sun in English.

The ancients worshipped the Sun as a god. In the Grecian Pantheon of Gods, they had Zeus as the primary god of Olympus which was also seen as the Sun-God. Many scholars believe that the word “Zeus” was the origin of the Latin word “deus”. Yup, they’re actually phonetically similar.

The early Spaniards, who invaded the Philippines, said the mass in Latin which used the word “deus” to mean a god. The Filipinos later on adopted the Latin word “deus” as part of their language, pronounced as “di-yos”, to mean “god”. And that’s where the Tagalog word “diyos” came…

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